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Beyond the Magnesium Hype - What You REALLY Need to Know

In recent years, magnesium has taken center stage as a cure-all for everything from migraine, to diabetes, to osteoporosis. But what's the truth? Should you take supplements daily or can you rely on your diet to provide all the magnesium you need?

Read on to find out.

Your body uses magnesium for over 300 chemical processes to keep you healthy (and happy!). Because you regularly use these essential minerals, your body works hard to maintain a stable and available level of magnesium blood.

When you use magnesium in your blood, your body will try to get it out of food or take it out of storage on your bones and soft tissue. If it doesn't get enough from both sources, your blood magnesium will be low. That's when you'll start to see the following symptoms:

· Fatigue

· Headache

· High blood pressure

· Irregular heart beat

· Softening and weakness of the bone

· Muscle weakness, cramps, or weakness

If you have any of these symptoms, consult your doctor immediately. You may experience life-threatening magnesium deficiency or other serious medical conditions.

While your doctor's blood test gives you a very helpful magnesium level test, remember that it does not tell you how much magnesium you have in your bones and soft tissue. You may need more magnesium in your body's "bank" to function optimally.

It is important to understand the importance of adequate magnesium storage in the body. You need a lot of magnesium in a pinch for an acute illness or stressor. Your body will depend on its stored resources to take you through your health crisis.

Therefore, the question remains. Should you add magnesium or depend on your food source?

First, ask yourself if your daily diet includes the following: green leafy vegetables, nuts, nuts and nuts, grains, and seeds. These are healthy foods and high in magnesium and tend to have lots of fiber and tons of other nutritional foods as well. Fish is another good source of magnesium nutrition.

If you answer yes, you eat a lot of healthy foods every day, it is likely that your diet provides all the magnesium you need for good health.

But here's another question.

Do you have the following conditions that put you at risk for low magnesium storage?

· Drink too much alcohol

· Diabetes

· Chronic diarrhea

· Congestive heart failure

· Low potassium levels

· Low calcium levels

· Take a water pill or acid reduction drug (proton pump inhibitor)

· Excessive sweating

· Excessive urine

Unfortunately, low magnesium stores often have no obvious signs or symptoms. As a rule of thumb, older people are at higher risk than the middle-aged. African Americans have the lowest magnesium intake compared to White America and Mexico. So if you are in a higher risk group or have one of the conditions mentioned above, there is a good chance you can store your magnesium.

In this case, is supplementation a great option? as long as you consult your doctor and don't overdo it. She can tell you what type of supplement is best for your particular health status and how much to take.

If you have any medical conditions or if you are taking any medicine, it is also important to consult your doctor before taking magnesium supplements. Magnesium supplements are actually a type of drug and can interact with other drugs. People with kidney problems should be careful about any medications and supplements.

While you should be careful not to exceed the recommended daily dose of magnesium supplements, keep in mind that there is no limit to how much magnesium you can take from FOOD.

That's because you are an amazing creation. My gut is pretty smart No. to absorb the excess NATURAL magnesium contained in food. But magnesium supplementation is actually a highly processed and concentrated form of pill. It does not follow the pattern of absorption of magnesium rich foods.

I've compiled a list of magnesium-rich foods that you like to mix and match. Aim for at least 400 magnesium a day from your diet.

In recent years, magnesium has taken center stage as a cure-all for everything from migraine, to diabetes, to osteoporosis. But what's the truth? Should you take supplements daily or can you rely on your diet to provide all the magnesium you need?

Read on to find out.

Your body uses magnesium for over 300 chemical processes to keep you healthy (and happy!). Because you regularly use these essential minerals, your body works hard to maintain a stable and available level of magnesium blood.

When you use magnesium in your blood, your body will try to get it out of food or take it out of storage on your bones and soft tissue. If it doesn't get enough from both sources, your blood magnesium will be low. That's when you'll start to see the following symptoms:

· Fatigue

· Headache

· High blood pressure

· Irregular heart beat

· Softening and weakness of the bone

· Muscle weakness, cramps, or weakness

If you have any of these symptoms, consult your doctor immediately. You may experience life-threatening magnesium deficiency or other serious medical conditions.

While your doctor's blood test gives you a very helpful magnesium level test, remember that it does not tell you how much magnesium you have in your bones and soft tissue. You may need more magnesium in your body's "bank" to function optimally.

It is important to understand the importance of adequate magnesium storage in the body. You need a lot of magnesium in a pinch for an acute illness or stressor. Your body will depend on its stored resources to take you through your health crisis.

Therefore, the question remains. Should you add magnesium or depend on your food source?

First, ask yourself if your daily diet includes the following: green leafy vegetables, nuts, nuts and nuts, grains, and seeds. These are healthy foods and high in magnesium and tend to have lots of fiber and tons of other nutritional foods as well. Fish is another good source of magnesium nutrition.

If you answer yes, you eat a lot of healthy foods every day, it is likely that your diet provides all the magnesium you need for good health.

But here's another question.

Do you have the following conditions that put you at risk for low magnesium storage?

· Drink too much alcohol

· Diabetes

· Chronic diarrhea

· Congestive heart failure

· Low potassium levels

· Low calcium levels

· Take a water pill or acid reduction drug (proton pump inhibitor)

· Excessive sweating

· Excessive urine

Unfortunately, low magnesium stores often have no obvious signs or symptoms. As a rule of thumb, older people are at higher risk than the middle-aged. African Americans have the lowest magnesium intake compared to White America and Mexico. So if you are in a higher risk group or have one of the conditions mentioned above, there is a good chance you can store your magnesium.

In this case, supplements are a great choice as long as you consult your doctor and don't overdo it. She can tell you what type of supplement is best for your particular health status and how much to take.

If you have any medical conditions or if you are taking any medicine, it is also important to consult your doctor before taking magnesium supplements. Magnesium supplements are actually a type of drug and can interact with other drugs. People with kidney problems should be careful about any medications and supplements.

While you should be careful not to exceed the recommended daily dose of magnesium supplements, keep in mind that there is no limit to how much magnesium you can take from FOOD.

That's because you are an amazing creation. My gut is pretty smart No. to absorb the excess NATURAL magnesium contained in food. But magnesium supplementation is actually a highly processed and concentrated form of pill. It does not follow the pattern of absorption of magnesium rich foods.

I've compiled a list of magnesium-rich foods that you like to mix and match. Aim for at least 400 magnesium a day from your diet.

Magnesium Rich Foods:

Beans and Seeds, mg / meal

almonds, dried, 1/4 cup, 105

Brazil beans, dried, 1/4 cup, 80

cashews, dried, 1/4 cup, 89

hemp-based, 1 tbsp, 39

peanut, roasted or dried, 1/4 cup, 67

peanut butter, 2 tbsp, 50

pecans, dried, 1/4 cup, 38

pumpkin seeds, 1/4 cup, 185

whole grain, 1 tbsp, 32 tbsp

sesame butter (tahini), 1 tbsp, 58

squash seeds, 1/4 cup, 185

sunflower seeds, 1/4 cup, 128

walnut, minced, 1/4 cup, 63

watermelon seeds, 1/4 cup, 140

Vegetables, mg / meal

avocado, pure, 1/2 cup, 35

asparagus, 1/2 cup, 18

bit, 1/2 cup, 32

broccoli, cooked, 1/2 cup, 51

green collar, cooked, 1/2 cup, 20

corn, 1/2 cup, 27

potatoes with skin, 1 medium, 48

kale kale, 1/2 cup, 30

seaweed, 1 oz, 58

spinach, cooked, 1/2 cup, 78

sweet peas1 / 2 cup, 32

tomatoes, raw, 1 cup, 20

tomato paste, 6 oz, 70

winter squash, 1 cup, 27

Fruits, mg / meal

banana, 1 medium, 33

cherries, 1/2 cup, 16

pineapple, 1/2 cup, 18

raisins, 1/2 cup, 26

raspberries, 1 cup, 27

Peanuts, mg / meal

blackeyed peas, 1/2 cup, 45

black beans, cooked, 1/2 cup, 60

kidney beans, cooked, 1/2 cup, 35

lentils, cooked, 1/2 cup, 36

door nuts, cooked, 1/2 cup, 43

soybeans, 1/4 cup, 63

Meat and Fish, mg / meal

beef, 3 oz, 21

chicken, 3 oz, 21

turkey, 3 oz, 21

blue fish, 3 oz, 21

flat fish, 3 oz, 26

cod, 3 oz, 30

halibut, 3 oz, 24

clams, 3 oz, 46

shrimp, 3 oz, 36

tempeh, cooked, 3 oz, 66

steam, 3 oz, 25

tuna, 3 oz, 30

Dairy Products, mg / meal

milk, regular or scheme, 1 cup, 30

Yogurt, 8 oz, 32

Grains and cereals, mg / meal

chopsticks, 1/2 cup, 42

red rice, cook, 1/2 cup, 42

bulgur, 1/2 cup, 29

buckwheat, roasted, 1/2 cup, 180

cream of wheat, 1 cup, 15

cereals, cooked, 1 cup, 77

oat bran, 1/4 cup, 55

oats, cooked, 1 cup, 60

quinoa, 1/2 cup, 60

wheat, 1/2 cup, 19

raisins raisins, 1 cup, 77

rice bran, 1/4 cup, 230

face, 1/2 cup, 90

spelled, 4 oz, 95

wheat bran, raw, 1/4 cup, 90

wheat germ, raw, 1/4 cup, 69

wheat bread, 1 piece, 23

Read on to find out the key to destroying the ticking health bombs that your body can absorb. Click here to find out the secret secrets to knowing so you can live a better, longer and healthier life.



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