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How to Get Through a Hemorrhoid Exam

You know you need to go to a doctor to find out your hemorrhoids, but fear often stops people. Is it too shameful to live? What questions will the doctor ask, and how embarrassing is it to answer it? How does the hemorrhoid exam work, though, and can it be avoided?

Well, the first thing is you need a trusted family doctor. For some reason, general practitioners will be the first ones you'll see, so it's important to establish a good long-term relationship. A good family doctor will want to get to know you, your exact medical history, your priorities and your personality. He will be your advocate and guide to the sometimes confusing world of medical practice, so it's obviously important to find people you love and can trust with the most intimate details of your life and health.

Once you come in to discuss your hemorrhoids specifically, your doctor may want to know the entire list of things. However, your personal details may not be available to them. He will want to know everything about your symptoms, and will be able to examine your diet and your physical activity levels. Writing down all of your symptoms, questions and concerns before your appointment is often a good idea, as you may feel so anxious about forgetting that you will soon forget! If your hemorrhoids do not require exams, at this time your doctor will give you lots of advice on how to change your lifestyle and diet and may prescribe painkillers, anti-inflammatory, or mild vasoconstrictors. Vasoconstrictor will make your blood vessels smaller, and will also target your hemorrhoids, which are blood vessels that expand beyond the normal range and cannot be smaller by itself.

After the initial conversation, if your hemorrhoids require a diagnosis or diagnosis, your general practitioner will either conduct an examination there at the office, or refer you to a specialist called a proctologist. A proctologist is a doctor who specializes in the entire structure of the colon, rectum and rectum. For the exam, you will be left to change into your normal clothes and get into the hospital gown. After you change, a superior will ask you to lie down on the table, and you will be wrapped in both your dignity and courtesy and the comfort and safety of your doctor. Draping works to maintain a clean environment so your doctor can work and make you feel better. The only part of you that looks like it should be the special part that your doctor needs to take note of. Doctors may perform external palpitation and visual examination, in which they take a long, detailed look at the outside of the anal sphincter and may release small amounts, a taste for lumps or anything abnormal. If the doctor was examining the internal hemorrhoids, he would use an anoscope, which is a tapered metal tube with a window cut in it for visual inspection of a quarter anterior canal. The doctor may have to re-insert it four times to check all relevant internal parts.

After the exam is over, everyone will leave you in the privacy of dressing in your usual clothes. After you get dressed again, the doctor should come back and discuss what he finds with you. After explaining what the exam shows you can understand and answer any questions you may have, you can begin discussing the best treatment options for you. Home remedies with changes in medication, diet and lifestyle are the most common ways to treat hemorrhoids, but surgical procedures may be better for your particular condition.

Feel free to ask your doctor any questions during this development. You have the right to consent, and if you do not understand what is going on, you cannot give your informed consent to treatment. This is not fair to you or your doctor. Doctors go to schools for years to give you access to modern medical knowledge and techniques, and they know quite a bit, but only you know yourself and your life. Both you and your doctor are happier when you take the time to become an educated partner in your healthcare.



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